Morning Edition

Weekdays 5:00AM-9:00AM
Renee Montagne, Steve Inskeep

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens.  Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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1:05am

Wed August 21, 2013
The Salt

Young Farmers Break The Bank Before They Get To The Field

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 11:29 am

Eva Teague, 31, is trying to start her own pig farm in Colorado but is running into financial obstacles typical of many young farmers trying to break into the business.
Luke Runyon KUNC/Harvest Public Media

As the average age of the American farmer has crept up to 60, fewer young people are filling in the ranks behind them. That's prompted some to ask if young people even want to farm anymore.

The quick answer is yes, just not in the same numbers as they used to. And surveys indicate many of them don't want to farm in conventional ways.

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1:05am

Wed August 21, 2013
Sweetness And Light

Tennis Fans: A Stadium Roof Is Coming. So Is Regis Philbin

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:03 am

The ugliest, most ill-conceived physical addition to sports scenery was the construction, a few years ago, of the Arthur Ashe tennis stadium at the U.S. Open. Typical U.S. supersize. We'll be bigger than everyone else, so there.

Alas, in the upper reaches of this charmless behemoth you need a GPS to find the players somewhere down there at sea level. Worse, should it rain, which it has a wont to do in New York, there are no players on the court and you get wet.

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1:04am

Wed August 21, 2013
Sports

With An Urban Face-Lift, Vintage Bike Polo Picks Up Speed

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:54 am

Jacob Newborn takes a shot past Lodewijk Broekhuizen (left) during a bike polo practice session in Milwaukee.
Morry Gash AP

Several vintage sports have seen resurgence among young people lately: roller derby, kickball and even bocce ball. But one century-old sport hasn't just found new fans; it's getting an urban makeover.

Welcome to hardcourt bike polo. On a hot, sunny day in Roseville, Minn., the second day of the 2013 North American Hardcourt Bike Polo Championship is about to begin.

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4:38am

Tue August 20, 2013
Animals

Obamas Welcome New Puppy To The White House

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with news of a new member of the First Family. Bo may be the first dog but he's no longer the only dog. He now has a sister - Sunny. She's just over a year old and, like Bo, she's a Portuguese water dog. She'll likely join Bo in some official duties like greeting kids at the annual Easter egg hunt. The White House blog says Sunny was born in Michigan. And we'll believe that, after we see the birth certificate. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

4:34am

Tue August 20, 2013
Around the Nation

Ball State Students Wins Free Tuition For Spring Semester

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana has an annual basketball challenge for incoming freshmen: Hit a shot from half court, win free tuition for a semester. No one had ever done it until this year. Markus Burden was picked randomly from the crowd. He missed twice and then sunk the shot.

He told the college paper this gives his family more financial breathing room. His mom told him to enjoy all of this attention - briefly - then hit the books.

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