All Things Considered

Weekdays 4:00-6:00 PM
Melissa Block, Robert Siegel

In-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features. 

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3:34pm

Thu November 21, 2013
The Kennedy Assassination, 50 Years Later

Moved By Kennedy's Death, The Boston Symphony Played On

Originally published on Thu November 21, 2013 7:08 pm

The Boston Symphony Orchestra was mid-performance when the news of President Kennedy's assassination broke.
AP

3:34pm

Thu November 21, 2013
Education

Unrelenting Poverty Leads To 'Desperation' In Philly Schools

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 7:01 am

Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett, a Republican, cut more than $1 billion from the state's K-12 budget, which hit the state-controlled Philadelphia district hardest.
Matt Slocum AP

This is the second in a three-part report on Philadelphia schools in crisis.

Philadelphia's Center City area sparkles with new restaurants, jobs and money. After declining for half a century, the city's population grew from 2006 to 2012.

But for people living in concentrated poverty in large swaths of North and West Philadelphia, the Great Recession only made life harder.

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3:34pm

Thu November 21, 2013
Arts & Life

Remembering 5Pointz: A Five-Story Building That Told Plenty More

Originally published on Thu November 21, 2013 4:54 pm

The walls of 5Pointz were once covered in graffiti. Artists worldwide came to New York to paint the warehouse surface.
Bruce Wallace for NPR

This week, New York City lost a cultural landmark. The site known as 5Pointz was a graffiti museum, of sorts — the walls of a 200,000-square-foot warehouse complex covered with ever-evolving spray-painted art. It spread across a block in Long Island City right across the water from Manhattan in the borough of Queens.

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2:12pm

Thu November 21, 2013
NPR Story

'Nasty Piece Of Work' Makes Spy-Turned-PI Work Well

Originally published on Thu November 21, 2013 4:54 pm

Alan Cheuse reviews Robert Littell's newest novel of a CIA agent turned private investigator, A Nasty Piece of Work.

2:12pm

Thu November 21, 2013
NPR Story

Sen. Wicker: Senate Democrats Are Opposed To Regular Order

Originally published on Thu November 21, 2013 4:54 pm

The Senate passed a major change to its filibuster rules Thursday. Now, the minority party can no longer easily block nominees, except for those to the Supreme Court. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid introduced the measure after Republicans had stalled the nominations of three judges to the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals. Robert Siegel talks to Republican Sen. Roger Wicker of Mississippi about the change. Earlier this year, Wicker helped strike a deal with Democrats to avert the so-called "nuclear option."

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