Jeff Brady

Jeff Brady is a NPR National Desk Correspondent based in Philadelphia. He covers the mid-Atlantic region and the energy industry.

In this role, Brady reports on the business of energy, from concerns over hydraulic fracturing in Western Pennsylvania to the oil boom in North Dakota and solar developments in the desert Southwest. With a focus on the consumer, Brady's reporting addresses how the energy industry intersects consumers' perspective at the gas pump and light switch.

Frequently traveling throughout the country for NPR, Brady has covered just about every major domestic news event in the past decade. Before moving to Philadelphia in July 2011, Brady was based in Denver and covered the west for NPR.

In 2005, Brady was among the NPR reporters who covered the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. His reporting on flooded cars left behind after the storm exposed efforts to stall the implementation of a national car titling system. Today, the National Motor Vehicle Title Information System is operational and the Department of Justice estimates it could save car buyers up to $11 billion a year.

Before coming to NPR in September 2003, Brady was a reporter at Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB) in Portland. He has also worked in commercial television as an anchor and a reporter; and commercial radio as a talk-show host and reporter.

Brady graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Communications from Southern Oregon State College (now Southern Oregon University).

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2:08pm

Wed April 9, 2014
News

Before Classes Even Begin, Mass Stabbing Leaves School Reeling

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 4:48 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And Melissa Block.

A 16 year-old boy is in custody after a knife attack at a high school near Pittsburgh left at least 20 people injured. Police say among the injured is a school police officer who stopped the attacker with the help of an assistant principal.

NPR's Jeff Brady reports the rampage began just before classes were about to start this morning.

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1:19am

Tue April 1, 2014
All Tech Considered

This Tax Season, Fraudsters May Target Your Refund

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 7:47 am

Fraudsters can get a lot of data by hacking payroll systems.
iStockphoto

You've already heard about thieves stealing credit card numbers, with the Target stores theft dominating the news headlines. But imagine what a thief could do with your company's payroll records. Those contain valuable information such as your Social Security number, date of birth, your address and how much you earn.

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1:20am

Tue March 25, 2014
Remembering The Exxon Valdez Oil Spill

Why Oil Drilling Is Both Safer And Riskier Since Exxon Valdez

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 12:59 pm

The Ohmsett research facility, which researches oil spill response, was closed just before the Exxon Valdez accident. It was reopened as part of the measures included in the Oil Pollution Act of 1990.
Jeff Brady NPR

A lot has changed for the energy industry since the Exxon Valdez hit a reef in 1989 and began spilling oil into Alaska's Prince William Sound. The outcry over images of oil-soaked wildlife and a once-pristine shoreline dirtied by crude ushered in greater scrutiny of oil operations and increased interest in research on how to clean up oil spills.

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1:02am

Tue March 11, 2014
Business

Customer Surveys Are Here To Stay. Suggestions For Improvement?

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 2:58 pm

Washington Post advice columnist Judith Martin compares surveys to an insecure friend: " 'Are you sure you like me? Really? Do you like me?' And after a while you want to say, 'No! Go away!' "
iStockphoto

Call the cable company, and an automated voice wants to ask you about the experience. Buy a taco at a fast-food chain, and the receipt says there's a chance to win $500 if you answer a few questions.

Customer surveys seem to be everywhere — something Judith Martin addressed in her Miss Manners column in January: "They are violating the first rule of business: Don't annoy the customer."

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8:03am

Sat February 1, 2014
Politics

State Department: Keystone XL Would Not Worsen Warming

Originally published on Sat February 1, 2014 10:00 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The Keystone XL oil pipeline may be closer to being built. The U.S. State Department's released an environmental impact statement that says the project would not make climate change any worse, and it's now up to President Obama to decide the fate of the pipeline. NPR's Jeff Brady reports that environmental groups and many Democrats want the president to reject the review's findings.

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