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3:30pm

Tue July 16, 2013
Aspen Music Festival & School

Festival Showcase - July 16th, 2013

Violinist and longtime AMFS faculty member Sylvia Rosenberg recounts stories of the festival's early years and what it was like studying with Nadia Boulanger.  And pianist Jeremy Denk discusses his love for writing and taste for adventurous repertoire.

12:01am

Tue July 16, 2013
Aspen Music Festival & School

Festival Notes - July 16th, 2013

At 7:30 p.m. at Harris Concert Hall, pianist Simone Dinnerstein and country singer-songwriter Tift Merritt perform together a concert that merges musical genres and landscapes.

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3:46pm

Mon July 15, 2013
The Book On The Pour House

Hangin' at The Pour House

At The Pour House
Credit Roberta McGowan

For the past three decades the venerable Pour House saloon has served up cold beer and warm meals to residents and visitors in Carbondale.  Opened by Skip Bell in 1984, the bar has become a generational watering hole for cowboys, hippies, artists and others.  Tuesday evening  (7/16/2013) at The Pour House there is a reception to unveil a new book of photographs and tales from the bar.  Aspen public Radio’s Roger Adams reports.

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2:45pm

Mon July 15, 2013
Environment

Tribes in Western U.S. Use Water to Assert Sovereignty

The Kerr Dam in Northwest Montana was built in the 1930's on the Flathead Indian Reservation. It's been owned by non-tribal companies since it was built.
Credit Marci Krivonen

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes in Montana stand to become the first tribes in the country to own a major hydroelectric dam. In Colorado, tribes are managing parts of hydro projects. All are examples of tribes regaining control of resources on their land. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

In Colorado’s southwest, the Ute Mountain Ute tribe co-manages part of the Dolores Water Project. And, near Durango, the Animas/La Plata project is partially managed by the state’s two tribes. Ernest House directs the Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs.

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1:14pm

Mon July 15, 2013
Science

Wildfires Contribute More to Atmospheric Warming, New Study Shows

Scanning electron microscope images revealing soot (bottom left) and tarball particles (top left, bottom right) collected from 2011 Las Conchas fire.
Credit LANL (China, S, Mazzoleni, C, Gorkowski, K, Aiken, AC, Dubey, MK; Nature Communications, 2013)

As the country recovers from the worst wildland firefighting accident in years, there’s more attention on fire crews and the homes they’re trying to protect. But an often invisible result of wildfire can have a big effect on human health and climate... even after the flames die down. Science correspondent Ellis Robinson takes a look at the effects of wildfire smoke on air quality. And that means understanding something called a “tarball.”

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