Environment

6:48pm

Mon August 5, 2013
Oil & Gas

Lessons Learned from Colorado’s Roan Plateau

Garfield County's Roan Plateau.
Elise Thatcher

Less than a decade ago, an oil and gas boom in Colorado started to fire up... and with it came strong opinions on all sides. One of the first major controversies was over the Roan Plateau, a sweeping mesa in Garfield County. The discord centered on a Congressional mandate to drill-- and worries that doing so would destroy world class hunting and fishing, and the local economy. Colorado’s governor and two senators weighed in, and the Rifle area was featured in the documentary GasLand.

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9:35pm

Wed July 17, 2013
Oil and Gas Development

Thompson Divide Coaliton's Buy-Out Method Used in Other Western States

Ranchers in the Rocky Mountain Front area in Montana formed a coalition to keep oil and gas development out of the region. They used a similar method being tried by a group in the Roaring Fork Valley.
Credit Marci Krivonen

 

When citizens want to block oil and gas development on public land, they usually get a lawyer and head to the courts.  In Carbondale, the Thompson Divide Coalition has taken another approach, choosing instead a game plan that is rarely used in the West. So far, the Coalition’s so-called “market-based” approach has yet to bear fruit. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

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12:48pm

Wed July 17, 2013
Colorado River

U.S. Senators Focus on Colorado River Challenges

Predicted imbalances in the Colorado River was up for discussion at a Senate hearing in Washington D.C. yesterday. The River provides water to nearly 40 million people.
Credit Marci Krivonen

The Colorado River and its future imbalances were the focus of a Senate hearing in Washington D.C. Tuesday. The river supplies water for cities and farms in seven states and parts of Mexico. Lawmakers went over a 2012 study that projects water demand will outpace supply in the coming decades. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

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2:45pm

Mon July 15, 2013
Environment

Tribes in Western U.S. Use Water to Assert Sovereignty

The Kerr Dam in Northwest Montana was built in the 1930's on the Flathead Indian Reservation. It's been owned by non-tribal companies since it was built.
Credit Marci Krivonen

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes in Montana stand to become the first tribes in the country to own a major hydroelectric dam. In Colorado, tribes are managing parts of hydro projects. All are examples of tribes regaining control of resources on their land. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

In Colorado’s southwest, the Ute Mountain Ute tribe co-manages part of the Dolores Water Project. And, near Durango, the Animas/La Plata project is partially managed by the state’s two tribes. Ernest House directs the Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs.

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4:11pm

Thu July 11, 2013
Climate Change

Aspen, CORE: Thumbs Up For National Climate Plan

President Barack Obama announces a climate action plan. June 25th, 2013.
Credit Whitehouse.gov

Last month, when President Barack Obama rolled out a national climate change initiative, a number of decision makers in the Roaring Fork Valley were listening closely.  The President’s plans to cap carbon emissions and boost energy efficiency are in line with much of what has been routine here for years.  Lucy Emerson-Bell is with CORE, the Community Office for Resource Efficiency.

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